In a previous blog post, I’ve shown how the programmatic MockDataProvider can be used to mock the entire API through a single functional interface:


// context contains the   and bind variables, etc.
MockDataProvider provider = context -> {

    // This defines the update counts,  sets, etc.
    // depending on the context above.
    return new MockResult[] { ... }
};

Writing the provider manually can be tedious in some cases, especially when a few static SQL strings need to be mocked and constant result sets would be OK. In that case, the MockFileDatabase is a convenient implementation that is based on a text file (or SQL string), which contains a of SQL string / result of the form:

  • SQL string
  • Result set
  • Update count

Assuming this is the content of the .txt file:


select first_name, last_name from actor;
> first_name last_name
> ---------- ---------
> GINA       DEGENERES
> WALTER     TORN     
> MARY       KEITEL   
@ rows: 3

select first_name, last_name, count(*)
from actor
join film_actor using (actor_id)
group by actor_id, first_name, last_name
order by count(*) desc;
> first_name last_name count
> ---------- --------- -----
> GINA       DEGENERES 42
> WALTER     TORN      41
> MARY       KEITEL    40
@ rows: 3

We can then easily load that file into a class and run queries against it:


import static .lang.System.out;
import .sql.*;
import org..tools.jdbc.*;

public class Mocking {
    public static void main(String[] args) throws Exception {
        MockDataProvider db = new MockFileDatabase(
            Mocking.class.getResourceAsStream("/mocking.txt");

        try (Connection c = new MockConnection(db));
            Statement s = c.createStatement()) {

            out.println("Actors:");
            out.println("-------");
            try (ResultSet rs = s.executeQuery(
                "select first_name, last_name from actor")) {
                while (rs.next())
                    out.println(rs.getString(1) 
                        + " " + rs.getString(2));
            }

            out.println();
            out.println("Actors and their films:");
            out.println("-----------------------");
            try (ResultSet rs = s.executeQuery(
                "select first_name, last_name, count(*)n" +
                "from actorn" +
                "join film_actor using (actor_id)n" +
                "group by actor_id, first_name, last_namen" +
                "order by count(*) desc")) {
                while (rs.next())
                    out.println(rs.getString(1) 
                        + " " + rs.getString(2) 
                        + " (" + rs.getInt(3) + ")");
            }
        }
    }
}

The above will print:


Actors:
-------
GINA DEGENERES
WALTER TORN
MARY KEITEL

Actors and their films:
-----------------------
GINA DEGENERES (42)
WALTER TORN (41)
MARY KEITEL (40)

Notice how we’re not really connecting to any database at all, but simply running queries against our mock database file, which contains a hard-coded set of SQL string / result pairs. While this obviously shouldn’t be used to implement / mock a full-fledged database, it is certainly very useful to intercept only a few queries and return hard-coded results to any JDBC based caller – regardless if they’re using jOOQ, Hibernate, or vanilla JDBC as in the above API.



Source link https://blog.jooq.org/2018/04/10/mocking-jdbc-using-a-set-of-sql-string-result-pairs/

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