A question that is frequently occurring among my SQL training‘s participants is:

What’s the between putting a predicate in the .. ON and the WHERE clause?

I can definitely see how that’s confusing some people, as there seems to be no difference at first sight, when running queries like these, e.g. in Oracle. I’m using the Sakila database, as always:


-- First query
SELECT a.actor_id, a.first_name, a.last_name, count(fa.film_id)
FROM actor a
LEFT JOIN film_actor fa ON a.actor_id = fa.actor_id
WHERE film_id < 10
GROUP BY a.actor_id, a.first_name, a.last_name
ORDER BY count(fa.film_id) ASC;

This will yield something like:


ACTOR_ID  FIRST_NAME  LAST_NAME  COUNT
--------------------------------------
108       WARREN      NOLTE      3
162       OPRAH       KILMER     3
19        BOB         FAWCETT    2
10        CHRISTIAN   GABLE      2
53        MENA        TEMPLE     2
137       MORGAN      WILLIAMS   1
2         NICK        WAHLBERG   1

Of course, we could have written this instead, and received the same result:


-- Second query
SELECT a.actor_id, a.first_name, a.last_name, count(fa.film_id)
FROM actor a
JOIN film_actor fa ON a.actor_id = fa.actor_id
  AND film_id < 10
GROUP BY a.actor_id, a.first_name, a.last_name
ORDER BY count(fa.film_id) DESC;

Now, I’ve moved the FILM_ID < 10 filter from the WHERE clause to the ON clause. But the execution plan is the same for both queries:


---------------------------------------------------------
| Id  | Operation               | Name          | Rows  |
---------------------------------------------------------
|   0 | SELECT STATEMENT        |               |    49 |
|   1 |  SORT ORDER BY          |               |    49 |
|   2 |   HASH GROUP BY         |               |    49 |
|*  3 |    HASH JOIN            |               |    49 |
|*  4 |     INDEX FAST FULL SCAN| PK_FILM_ACTOR |    49 |
|   5 |     VIEW                | VW_GBF_7      |   200 |
|   6 |      TABLE ACCESS FULL  | ACTOR         |   200 |
---------------------------------------------------------
 
Predicate Information (identified by operation id):
---------------------------------------------------
 
   3 - access("ITEM_1"="FA"."ACTOR_ID")
   4 - filter("FA"."FILM_ID"<10)

It does not seem matter at all. Both queries yield the same result as well as the same plan. So…

Are ON and WHERE really the same thing?

They are when you run an inner join. But they are not when you run an outer join.

And now, let’s compare these two queries here:


-- First query
SELECT a.actor_id, a.first_name, a.last_name, count(fa.film_id)
FROM actor a
LEFT JOIN film_actor fa ON a.actor_id = fa.actor_id
WHERE film_id < 10
GROUP BY a.actor_id, a.first_name, a.last_name
ORDER BY count(fa.film_id) ASC;

Yielding


ACTOR_ID  FIRST_NAME  LAST_NAME  COUNT
--------------------------------------
194       MERYL       ALLEN      1
198       MARY        KEITEL     1
30        SANDRA      PECK       1
85        MINNIE      ZELLWEGER  1
123       JULIANNE    DENCH      1

Notice that with this syntax, we’re not getting any actors that have no films with FILM_ID < 10. We should get dozens! How about this:


-- Second query
SELECT a.actor_id, a.first_name, a.last_name, count(fa.film_id)
FROM actor a
LEFT JOIN film_actor fa ON a.actor_id = fa.actor_id
  AND film_id < 10
GROUP BY a.actor_id, a.first_name, a.last_name
ORDER BY count(fa.film_id) ASC;

This used to produce the same result for an (INNER) JOIN, but given the LEFT JOIN, we’re now not getting Susan Davis in the result:


ACTOR_ID  FIRST_NAME  LAST_NAME     COUNT
-----------------------------------------
3         ED          CHASE         0
4         JENNIFER    DAVIS         0
5         JOHNNY      LOLLOBRIGIDA  0
6         BETTE       NICHOLSON	    0
...
1         PENELOPE    GUINESS       1
200       THORA       TEMPLE        1
2         NICK        WAHLBERG      1
198       MARY        KEITEL        1

The plans are also different:


---------------------------------------------------------
| Id  | Operation               | Name          | Rows  |
---------------------------------------------------------
|   0 | SELECT STATEMENT        |               |    49 |
|   1 |  SORT ORDER BY          |               |    49 |
|   2 |   HASH GROUP BY         |               |    49 |
|*  3 |    HASH JOIN            |               |    49 |
|*  4 |     INDEX FAST FULL SCAN| PK_FILM_ACTOR |    49 |
|   5 |     VIEW                | VW_GBF_7      |   200 |
|   6 |      TABLE ACCESS FULL  | ACTOR         |   200 |
---------------------------------------------------------
 
Predicate Information (identified by operation id):
---------------------------------------------------
 
   3 - access("ITEM_1"="FA"."ACTOR_ID")
   4 - filter("FA"."FILM_ID"<10)

No outer join here! Versus


---------------------------------------------------------------
| Id  | Operation                     | Name          | Rows  |
---------------------------------------------------------------
|   0 | SELECT STATEMENT              |               |   200 |
|   1 |  SORT ORDER BY                |               |   200 |
|   2 |   MERGE JOIN OUTER            |               |   200 |
|   3 |    TABLE ACCESS BY INDEX ROWID| ACTOR         |   200 |
|   4 |     INDEX FULL SCAN           | PK_ACTOR      |   200 |
|*  5 |    SORT JOIN                  |               |    44 |
|   6 |     VIEW                      | VW_GBC_5      |    44 |
|   7 |      HASH GROUP BY            |               |    44 |
|*  8 |       INDEX FAST FULL SCAN    | PK_FILM_ACTOR |    49 |
---------------------------------------------------------------
 
Predicate Information (identified by operation id):
---------------------------------------------------
 
   5 - access("A"."ACTOR_ID"="ITEM_1"(+))
       filter("A"."ACTOR_ID"="ITEM_1"(+))
   8 - filter("FILM_ID"(+)<10)

The first query did not produce an outer join operation, the second one did!

What’s the difference?

The difference is:

  • An INNER JOIN produces all the actors who played in at least one film, filtering out the actors who did not play in a film. That’s the very definition of an inner join. If we filter the films with FILM_ID < 10, that simply means we don’t want any actors without such films either.
  • A LEFT JOIN will produce all the rows from the left side of the join, regardless if there is a matching row on the right side of the join.

In both cases, the matching rows are determined by the ON clause. If two rows don’t match, then:

  • The INNER JOIN removes them both from the result
  • The LEFT JOIN retains the left row in the result

But regardless what the JOIN produces, the WHERE clause will again remove rows that do not satisfy the filter. So,

  • In the INNER JOIN case, it does not matter if we remove actors with no films, and then actors without films with FILM_ID < 10, OR if we remove actors with no films with FILM_ID < 10 directly. They’re going to be removed anyway.
  • In the LEFT JOIN case, it does matter if we retain actors with no films, and then remove actors without films with FILM_ID < 10 (in case of which actors without films will be removed again), OR if we retain actors without films with FILM_ID < 10, and then not apply any further filters.

Conclusion

For INNER JOIN, WHERE predicates and ON predicates have the same effect.

For OUTER JOIN, WHERE predicates and ON predicates have a different effect.

In general, it is always best to put a predicate where it belongs, logically. If the predicate is related to a JOIN operation, it belongs in the ON clause. If a predicate is related to a filter applied to the entire FROM clause, it belongs in the WHERE clause.



Source link https://blog..org/2019/04/09/the-difference-between--join-on-clause-and-the-where-clause/

LEAVE A REPLY

Please enter your comment!
Please enter your name here